• Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye has not lifted restrictions on opening the San Juan River for irrigation purposes. “I am furious that the USEPA has placed the Navajo Nation into this position. Our farms will not last much longer without water and our resources are depleting,” said President Begaye. “These past few days I have visited with the farmers along the San Juan River because they are part of this decision.”

  • "We will overcome this tragedy, I have declared a state of emergency and deployed Navajo Nation resources to take on this sludge moving through our Great and Beautiful Navajo Nation. I also called upon President Obama and our Congressional Representatives to immediately appropriate emergency funds to meet the immediate needs of our People such as drinking water, animal feed, and clean irrigation water. Thank you to all the Navajo Nation personnel on the frontline working tirelessly to protect our people, our water and our land. Continue to pray, take care of each other and we will sustain" - President Russell Begaye

  • On Aug. 3, the U.S. EPA released its final Clean Power Plan, a rule that would cut carbon dioxide emissions at a national level by 32 percent from 2005 levels. This would be achieved by 2030. Included in the plan are carbon reductions for the Navajo Nation. The final rule affects the Navajo Generating Station and Four Corners Power Plant. Follow this link to read Navajo President Russell Begaye's statement about the plan.

  • The 23rd Navajo Nation Council is pleased to announce the the 2015 Summer Council Session edition of Naat'aji Nahat'a Hane' (Legislative Branch News). Follow this link to read about legislation results, voting records and news items on events that took place during last week's summer council session.

  • Navajo Nation Speaker LoRenzo Bates provided testimony in opposition to HR 1028, a bill introduced by Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.). This bill would divide approximately 21,000 acres of land and infrastructure in the former Fort Wingate Depot Activity located in McKinley County, New Mexico, between the Navajo Nation and the Zuni Pueblo.

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Welcome to the Navajo Nation Washington Office

Founded in 1984 and located on Capitol Hill, the Navajo Nation Washington Office serves as the Navajo Nation's advocate with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. The NNWO monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, disseminates congressional and federal agencies' information, develops strategies and decisions concerning national policies and budgets that affect the Navajo Nation.

About Us

 

Who We Are

Learn more about the Navajo Nation

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Who We Are

Enter Washington, DC from any direction, on any road, and you will experience its most striking qualities--national monuments, world- renowned museums, and most importantly, the center of the United States political power.

The Navajo Nation has a storied history with the United States government that has resulted in a government-to-government relationship between the two sovereigns. This relationship finds its foundation in our sacred Treaty of 1868. Navajo leaders since then have been meeting with Washington, DC officials as sovereigns. 

As a result of this government-to-government relationship the Navajo Nation has found it necessary to continue the Navajo Nation's presence in Washington, DC and thus officially opened the Navajo Nation Washington Office in 1984.

The Washington Office monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, disseminates congressional and federal agencies’ information, develops strategies and decisions concerning national policies and budgets that affect the Navajo Nation. It also assists the Navajo Nation in developing legislative language and testimony.

The NNWO is located on Capitol Hill and serves as the Navajo Nation's advocate with Congress, the White House, and federal agencies. Since August 1984 our office has served as an extension of the Navajo Nation government to represent our concerns to the federal government and agencies.

Meet the team.

 

Visiting Us

We welcome you to visit our offices.

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Visiting Washington, DC

We welcome you to visit our offices located at 750 First St., NE Suite 1010, Washington DC 20002. Contact our office to schedule a visit (202) 682-7390 or email at info@nnwo.org

We are conveniently located two blocks from Union Station Metro Stop on the Red Line.

 

What We Do

Learn more about what we do and how you can get involved.

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What We Do
  • Bills: View bill summaries, Navajo support/opposition, history of the bill, floor action, and votes.

  • Administrative policies: Find agency action items on issue areas, grant alerts, Federal register notices, national meetings, and consultation dates/announcements.

  • White papers: Read analyses of policies and issues affecting the Navajo Nation.

  • Budget numbers: View detailed breakdowns of budget items.

 

About Navajo

Learn more about the Navajo Nation

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Who We Are

The Navajo Nation is the largest tribal nation in the United States, with over 300,000 citizens. The Navajo Nation extends into the states of Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, encompassing over 27,000 square miles of unparalleled beauty. Diné Bikéyah, or Navajoland, is larger than 10 of the 50 states in the United States.

The reservation includes more than 14 million acres of trust lands, which are leased for various productive uses, including farming; grazing; oil, gas, and other mineral development; businesses; rights-of-way; timber harvesting; and housing.

Visitors from around the world are intrigued and mystified when they hear the Navajo language – so, too, were the enemy during World War II. Unknown to many, the Navajo language was used to create a secret code to battle the Japanese. Navajo men were selected to create codes and serve on the front line to overcome and deceive those on the other side of the battlefield. Today, these men are recognized as the famous Navajo Code Talkers, who exemplify the unequaled bravery and patriotism of the Navajo people.