• WASHINGTON—Avoiding a government shutdown, Congress passed and the president signed a continuing resolution (H.J. Res. 123) that keeps the federal government funded until Friday, December 22, 2017. Although this extension was signed into law, there are some doubts that Congress can pass appropriation bills within that timeframe. If that is the case, Congress will need to pass another extension.

  • WASHINGTON— President Begaye testified today in support of S. 664, the Navajo Utah Water Rights Settlement Act of 2017 . The Navajo Nation Council approved the settlement agreement in January 2016. It reflects over a decade of negotiations involving officials from the Navajo Nation, the State of Utah, and since 2013, the federal government. “This legislation, if enacted, will help the Navajo Nation build vital infrastructure - infrastructure that will help our next generation to be our most successful generation yet,” concluded President Begaye.

  • WINDOW ROCK - The Navajo Nation has suffered a tragic loss in the passing of George P. Willie Sr., a Navajo Code Talker, 2nd Marine Division who served from 1943 to 1946. According to his family, Willie passed away on Tuesday, Dec. 5 at 9:45 a.m., at his home in Leupp, Ariz.
    “I remember George P. Willie as a kind father and grandfather who held his service with pride and dignity,” President Russell Begaye said. “Like many of our Code Talkers, Willie enlisted into the military at a young age and went on to courageously defend our freedom and liberty as the United States of America.”

  • WASHINGTON, DC - Today, during an event at the White House honoring Native American Code Talkers, President Donald Trump made reference to Sen. Elizabeth Warren as “Pocahontas.” The remark prompted immediate backlash. “First and foremost, we appreciate the honor and recognition that has been bestowed upon the Navajo Code Talkers, who truly are National Treasures and protectors of freedom,” Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye said.

  • WINDOW ROCK, Ariz.—The Navajo Nation launched the Tribal Access Program on Tuesday, November 14, 2017, in Window Rock, Arizona. The Tribal Access Program is a program within the U.S. Department of Justice (USDOJ) allowing tribes access to the National Crime Information System for both criminal and civil purposes.

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Welcome to the Navajo Nation Washington Office

Founded in 1984 and located on Capitol Hill, the Navajo Nation Washington Office serves as the Navajo Nation's advocate with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. The NNWO monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, disseminates congressional and federal agencies' information, develops strategies and decisions concerning national policies and budgets that affect the Navajo Nation.

About Us

 

Who We Are

Learn more about the Navajo Nation

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Who We Are

Enter Washington, DC from any direction, on any road, and you will experience its most striking qualities--national monuments, world- renowned museums, and most importantly, the center of the United States political power.

The Navajo Nation has a storied history with the United States government that has resulted in a government-to-government relationship between the two sovereigns. This relationship finds its foundation in our sacred Treaty of 1868. Navajo leaders since then have been meeting with Washington, DC officials as sovereigns. 

As a result of this government-to-government relationship the Navajo Nation has found it necessary to continue the Navajo Nation's presence in Washington, DC and thus officially opened the Navajo Nation Washington Office in 1984.

The Washington Office monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, disseminates congressional and federal agencies’ information, develops strategies and decisions concerning national policies and budgets that affect the Navajo Nation. It also assists the Navajo Nation in developing legislative language and testimony.

The NNWO is located on Capitol Hill and serves as the Navajo Nation's advocate with Congress, the White House, and federal agencies. Since August 1984 our office has served as an extension of the Navajo Nation government to represent our concerns to the federal government and agencies.

Meet the team.

 

Visiting Us

We welcome you to visit our offices.

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Visiting Washington, DC

We welcome you to visit our offices located at 750 First St., NE Suite 1010, Washington DC 20002. Contact our office to schedule a visit (202) 682-7390 or email at info@nnwo.org

We are conveniently located two blocks from Union Station Metro Stop on the Red Line.

 

What We Do

Learn more about what we do and how you can get involved.

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What We Do
  • Bills: View bill summaries, Navajo support/opposition, history of the bill, floor action, and votes.

  • Administrative policies: Find agency action items on issue areas, grant alerts, Federal register notices, national meetings, and consultation dates/announcements.

  • White papers: Read analyses of policies and issues affecting the Navajo Nation.

  • Budget numbers: View detailed breakdowns of budget items.

 

About Navajo

Learn more about the Navajo Nation

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Who We Are

The Navajo Nation is the largest tribal nation in the United States, with over 300,000 citizens. The Navajo Nation extends into the states of Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, encompassing over 27,000 square miles of unparalleled beauty. Diné Bikéyah, or Navajoland, is larger than 10 of the 50 states in the United States.

The reservation includes more than 14 million acres of trust lands, which are leased for various productive uses, including farming; grazing; oil, gas, and other mineral development; businesses; rights-of-way; timber harvesting; and housing.

Visitors from around the world are intrigued and mystified when they hear the Navajo language – so, too, were the enemy during World War II. Unknown to many, the Navajo language was used to create a secret code to battle the Japanese. Navajo men were selected to create codes and serve on the front line to overcome and deceive those on the other side of the battlefield. Today, these men are recognized as the famous Navajo Code Talkers, who exemplify the unequaled bravery and patriotism of the Navajo people.

 

 

Upcoming Events

There are no upcoming events at this time. Please check back later.

From the Blog

07/24/2017 - 4:06pm

WASHINGTON—The U.S. Department of the Interior released proposed land into trust regulations including reinstating "the 30-day delay for taking land into trust following a decision by the Secretary or Assistant Secretary."

The abstract reads:

"This rule revises existing regulations governing off-reservation trust acquisitions to establish new items that must be included in an application and threshold criteria that must be met for off-reservation acquisitions before National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance will be required. The rule will also reinstate the 30-day delay for taking land into trust following a decision by the Secretary or Assistant Secretary."

05/25/2017 - 9:45am

Acting Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs, Michael S. Black, invites Tribal leaders to attend one of the listed listening sessions to provide input on improving "efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability" at the Department of the Interior.